Saturday is Remembrance Day, so this week I would like to dedicate ‘Vintage Photo Tuesday‘ to the Canadian Women on the WW2 Home Front. This post is also part of a previous one I did last year, that you can view HERE.

Out of a Canadian wartime population of more than 11 million, 261,000 women worked in Canadian war industries, 400,000 in the civilian workforce, 760,000 on farms and countless others in the home and in the volunteer sector.

Women’s enthusiasm for helping out on the home front was anticipated by Alice Sorby of Winnipeg who recalled in 1940, “In September 1939 when the thunder of war first crashed about our ears, the immediate reaction was an almost hysterical desire to do something….” (Source).

Here are those brave women in action….

Female loggers (‘lumberjills’) in the Queen Charlotte Islands, BC. April 1943

Female loggers (‘lumberjills') in the Queen Charlotte Islands, BC. April 1943
Source: Library and Archives Canada PA-116147

Actress Mary Pickford posing with a group of employees during her visit to the General Engineering Company (Canada) munitions factory, June 5, 1943.

Actress Mary Pickford posing with a group of employees during her visit to the General Engineering Company (Canada) munitions factory, June 5, 1943.
Source: Archives of Canada

Young woman working in the cabin of bomber being manufactured at the Fairchild plant in Montreal on May 19, 1941.

Source: CBC.ca

Off to work in Edmonton 1943.

Canadian Women arrive for work in Edmonton 1943 vintage photo
Source: Legion Magazine

A welder works on a Bren gun at John Inglis Company Ltd., 1942.

A welder works on a Bren gun at John Inglis Company Ltd 1942 vintage photo
Source: Legion Magazine

Women volunteers from Canadian Red Cross assemble packages for prisoners of war in 1942.

1940s Canadian Women helping on the homefront vintage photo
Source: Wikipedia

Starting in 1942, Vancouver’s Burrard Drydock hired more than 1,000 women. Here we see the union’s shop stewards eating in the shipyard canteen, ca. 1942 (Source).

Canadian Women working in a shipyard 1940s vintage photo
Source: Open Text BC

Workers producing primers.

1940s canadian women on the homefront producing primers in a factory vintage image
Source: War Museum

Start your Victory Garden today!

Victory Garden 1940s Canada Ad Vintage
Source: Gulf of Georgia Cannery

1942, knitters working on the BC Telephone Co. War Effort Programme in Victoria. It was a group of ladies coming together to sit, talk, and knit scarves and socks for the men fighting overseas (Source).

1940s Gulf of Georgia Cannery Knit In Vintage Image of women on the homefront
Source: Gulf of Georgia Cannery
1940s Canadian Fraser Valley Propaganda Poster for Homefront vintage ad
Source: Mothers of the Home Front

While looking for photos to share, I came across a fantastic 10 min Canadian Documentary entitled ‘The Home Front‘ by Stanley Hawes (seen below).

This short documentary is part of the Canada Carries On series of morale-boosting wartime propaganda films. In Home Front, the various WWII-era social contributions of women are highlighted. From medicine to industrial labour to hospitality, education and domesticity, the service these women provided to their country is lauded. (Video Link)

Friends…If you are interested to read other posts I have created around the Canadian WW2 Home Front, the links are below.

Liz

6 comments on “Vintage Photo Tuesday: WW2 Canadian Women on the Home Front (Part 2)”

  1. I absolutely LOVE this post. Even as a Canadian, it’s been hard for me to find information about Canada’s role in WWII, let alone the role Canadian women played, so reading this post and seeing the video you shared has been WONDERFUL!! I’m going to read your previous posts on the topic!

    Thank you SO MUCH for this post!!

    • If you follow the links of some of the images I posted, you will find quite a few articles/websites on Canadian Women’s roles during WW2 (at home and abroad). Happy Reading and I’m glad you enjoyed the post 🙂

    • I’m reading a book about those ladies in white, called ‘Bomb Girls’ (not the TV show lol). It super interesting about how they worked in a factory making bombs and nobody was hurt. Amazing women.

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